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. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and Sit

21 Feb

2. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and SitVerbs which take an object are usually called transitive verbs. Verbs which do not take an object are usually called intransitive verbs.


Many English verbs can be used either intransitively or transitively. For instance, in the sentence Most birds can fly, the verb to flyis intransitive, since it is used without an object. But in the sentence This pilot will fly the plane, the verb to fly is transitive, since it takes the object plane.


However, some English verbs can be used only intransitively. A few pairs of verbs should be noted. The two verbs of each pair have similar meanings, but one of the verbs can take an object, and the other cannot. In the following table, the verbs labeled intransitive are those which cannot take an object.

   

 http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/durrus/153/gramch11.html#2

  Infinitive Simple Past Past Participle
  Transitive:   to lay   laid   laid
  Intransitive:   to lie   lay   lain
 
  Transitive:   to raise   raised   raised
  Intransitive:   to rise   rose   risen
 
  Transitive:   to set   set   set
  Intransitive:   to sit   sat   sat

 

. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and Sit

21 Feb

2. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and SitVerbs which take an object are usually called transitive verbs. Verbs which do not take an object are usually called intransitive verbs.


Many English verbs can be used either intransitively or transitively. For instance, in the sentence Most birds can fly, the verb to flyis intransitive, since it is used without an object. But in the sentence This pilot will fly the plane, the verb to fly is transitive, since it takes the object plane.


However, some English verbs can be used only intransitively. A few pairs of verbs should be noted. The two verbs of each pair have similar meanings, but one of the verbs can take an object, and the other cannot. In the following table, the verbs labeled intransitive are those which cannot take an object.

   

 http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/durrus/153/gramch11.html#2

  Infinitive Simple Past Past Participle
  Transitive:   to lay   laid   laid
  Intransitive:   to lie   lay   lain
 
  Transitive:   to raise   raised   raised
  Intransitive:   to rise   rose   risen
 
  Transitive:   to set   set   set
  Intransitive:   to sit   sat   sat

 

. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and Sit

21 Feb

2. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and SitVerbs which take an object are usually called transitive verbs. Verbs which do not take an object are usually called intransitive verbs.


Many English verbs can be used either intransitively or transitively. For instance, in the sentence Most birds can fly, the verb to flyis intransitive, since it is used without an object. But in the sentence This pilot will fly the plane, the verb to fly is transitive, since it takes the object plane.


However, some English verbs can be used only intransitively. A few pairs of verbs should be noted. The two verbs of each pair have similar meanings, but one of the verbs can take an object, and the other cannot. In the following table, the verbs labeled intransitive are those which cannot take an object.

   

 http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/durrus/153/gramch11.html#2

  Infinitive Simple Past Past Participle
  Transitive:   to lay   laid   laid
  Intransitive:   to lie   lay   lain
 
  Transitive:   to raise   raised   raised
  Intransitive:   to rise   rose   risen
 
  Transitive:   to set   set   set
  Intransitive:   to sit   sat   sat

 

. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and Sit

21 Feb

2. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and SitVerbs which take an object are usually called transitive verbs. Verbs which do not take an object are usually called intransitive verbs.


Many English verbs can be used either intransitively or transitively. For instance, in the sentence Most birds can fly, the verb to flyis intransitive, since it is used without an object. But in the sentence This pilot will fly the plane, the verb to fly is transitive, since it takes the object plane.


However, some English verbs can be used only intransitively. A few pairs of verbs should be noted. The two verbs of each pair have similar meanings, but one of the verbs can take an object, and the other cannot. In the following table, the verbs labeled intransitive are those which cannot take an object.

   

 http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/durrus/153/gramch11.html#2

  Infinitive Simple Past Past Participle
  Transitive:   to lay   laid   laid
  Intransitive:   to lie   lay   lain
 
  Transitive:   to raise   raised   raised
  Intransitive:   to rise   rose   risen
 
  Transitive:   to set   set   set
  Intransitive:   to sit   sat   sat

 

. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and Sit

21 Feb

2. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and SitVerbs which take an object are usually called transitive verbs. Verbs which do not take an object are usually called intransitive verbs.


Many English verbs can be used either intransitively or transitively. For instance, in the sentence Most birds can fly, the verb to flyis intransitive, since it is used without an object. But in the sentence This pilot will fly the plane, the verb to fly is transitive, since it takes the object plane.


However, some English verbs can be used only intransitively. A few pairs of verbs should be noted. The two verbs of each pair have similar meanings, but one of the verbs can take an object, and the other cannot. In the following table, the verbs labeled intransitive are those which cannot take an object.

   

 http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/durrus/153/gramch11.html#2

  Infinitive Simple Past Past Participle
  Transitive:   to lay   laid   laid
  Intransitive:   to lie   lay   lain
 
  Transitive:   to raise   raised   raised
  Intransitive:   to rise   rose   risen
 
  Transitive:   to set   set   set
  Intransitive:   to sit   sat   sat

 

. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and Sit

21 Feb

2. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and SitVerbs which take an object are usually called transitive verbs. Verbswhich do not take an object are usually called intransitive verbs.


Many English verbs can be used either intransitively or transitively.For instance, in the sentence Most birds can fly, the verb to flyis intransitive, since it is used without an object. But in thesentence This pilot will fly the plane, the verb to fly is transitive, since it takes the object plane.


However, some English verbs can be used only intransitively. A fewpairs of verbs should be noted. The two verbs of each pair have similarmeanings, but one of the verbs can take an object, and the other cannot.In the following table, the verbs labeled intransitive are those whichcannot take an object.

   

 http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/durrus/153/gramch11.html#2

  Infinitive Simple Past Past Participle
  Transitive:   to lay   laid   laid
  Intransitive:   to lie   lay   lain
 
  Transitive:   to raise   raised   raised
  Intransitive:   to rise   rose   risen
 
  Transitive:   to set   set   set
  Intransitive:   to sit   sat   sat

 

. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and Sit

21 Feb

2. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and SitVerbs which take an object are usually called transitive verbs. Verbs which do not take an object are usually called intransitive verbs.


Many English verbs can be used either intransitively or transitively. For instance, in the sentence Most birds can fly, the verb to flyis intransitive, since it is used without an object. But in the sentence This pilot will fly the plane, the verb to fly is transitive, since it takes the object plane.


However, some English verbs can be used only intransitively. A few pairs of verbs should be noted. The two verbs of each pair have similar meanings, but one of the verbs can take an object, and the other cannot. In the following table, the verbs labeled intransitive are those which cannot take an object.

   

 http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/durrus/153/gramch11.html#2

  Infinitive Simple Past Past Participle
  Transitive:   to lay   laid   laid
  Intransitive:   to lie   lay   lain
 
  Transitive:   to raise   raised   raised
  Intransitive:   to rise   rose   risen
 
  Transitive:   to set   set   set
  Intransitive:   to sit   sat   sat

 

. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and Sit

21 Feb

2. Lay and Lie, Raise and Rise, and Set and SitVerbs which take an object are usually called transitive verbs. Verbswhich do not take an object are usually called intransitive verbs.


Many English verbs can be used either intransitively or transitively.For instance, in the sentence Most birds can fly, the verb to flyis intransitive, since it is used without an object. But in thesentence This pilot will fly the plane, the verb to fly is transitive, since it takes the object plane.


However, some English verbs can be used only intransitively. A fewpairs of verbs should be noted. The two verbs of each pair have similarmeanings, but one of the verbs can take an object, and the other cannot.In the following table, the verbs labeled intransitive are those whichcannot take an object.

   

 http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/durrus/153/gramch11.html#2

  Infinitive Simple Past Past Participle
  Transitive:   to lay   laid   laid
  Intransitive:   to lie   lay   lain
 
  Transitive:   to raise   raised   raised
  Intransitive:   to rise   rose   risen
 
  Transitive:   to set   set   set
  Intransitive:   to sit   sat   sat

 

ADJECTIVES + NOUN COMBINATIONS

6 Ene

Idioms: Adjective + Noun Combinations

The idioms here are made of adjective + noun combinations. They can be used as subjects, objects, and noun phrases after prepositions.

You should understand these expressions, know other ways of saying the same thing, and know which of these synonyms to use in a particular context. You can learn a lot about an idiom if you look at the context of its use. Try to guess the meaning of each idiom as it is used in the following sentences. Then, click on any idiom for complete explanations and examples, but be aware that these expressions may have other meanings not listed here. Remember: you can use Word Neighbors to find out how frequently any expression is used in English.

1. Joe has borrowed money three times without paying me back, and now he wants $50! That’s the last straw!

2. I had a close call when a big truck nearly hit me as I was crossing the street.

3. He thinks and talks as if he knows everything, but he really doesn’t; he’s full of hot air.

4. My friend thinks he’s a big shot because he has some responsibilities in the city mayor’s office.

5. When I said I liked her dinner, which really was terrible, I told a white lie because I didn’t want to hurt her feelings.

6. At first Mary agreed to marry John, but soon she was having second thoughts.

7. Because Mr. Smith knows the ins and cuts of plumbing, he’s an old hand at it.

8. Joe puts his heart and soul into his work, so that everyone thinks he’s a real eager beaver.

9. I’m afraid that there’s no way we can fix your old car; you’d better get rid of it because it’s a lost cause.

10. At most parties, people socialize by engaging in a lot of informal small talk.

ADJECTIVES + NOUN COMBINATIONS

6 Ene

Idioms: Adjective + Noun Combinations

The idioms here are made of adjective + noun combinations. They can be used as subjects, objects, and noun phrases after prepositions.

You should understand these expressions, know other ways of saying the same thing, and know which of these synonyms to use in a particular context. You can learn a lot about an idiom if you look at the context of its use. Try to guess the meaning of each idiom as it is used in the following sentences. Then, click on any idiom for complete explanations and examples, but be aware that these expressions may have other meanings not listed here. Remember: you can use Word Neighbors to find out how frequently any expression is used in English.

1. Joe has borrowed money three times without paying me back, and now he wants $50! That’s the last straw!

2. I had a close call when a big truck nearly hit me as I was crossing the street.

3. He thinks and talks as if he knows everything, but he really doesn’t; he’s full of hot air.

4. My friend thinks he’s a big shot because he has some responsibilities in the city mayor’s office.

5. When I said I liked her dinner, which really was terrible, I told a white lie because I didn’t want to hurt her feelings.

6. At first Mary agreed to marry John, but soon she was having second thoughts.

7. Because Mr. Smith knows the ins and cuts of plumbing, he’s an old hand at it.

8. Joe puts his heart and soul into his work, so that everyone thinks he’s a real eager beaver.

9. I’m afraid that there’s no way we can fix your old car; you’d better get rid of it because it’s a lost cause.

10. At most parties, people socialize by engaging in a lot of informal small talk.