Archivo | catalan RSS feed for this section

The Exclamation Mark

16 Feb

The Exclamation
Mark

interjection, or command.

Use an exclamation point [ ! ] at the end of an emphatic declaration,

“No!” he yelled. “Do it now!”

An exclamation mark may be used to close questions that are meant to convey extreme emotion, as in

What on earth are you doing! Stop!

An exclamation mark can be inserted within parentheses to emphasize a word within a sentence.

We have some really(!) low-priced rugs on sale this week.

Note that there is no space between the last letter of the word so emphasized and the parentheses. This device should be used rarely, if ever, in formal text.

An exclamation mark will often accompany mimetically produced sounds, as in

“All night long, the dogs woof! in my neighbor’s yard” and

“The bear went Grr!, and I went left.”

If an exclamation mark is part of an italicized or underlined title, make sure that the exclamation mark is also italicized or underlined:

My favorite book is Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

(Do not add a period after such a sentence that ends with the title’s exclamation mark. The exclamation mark will also suffice to end the sentence.) If the exclamation mark is not part of a sentence-ending title, don’t italicize the exclamation mark:

I’ve asked you not to sing la Marseillaise!

In academic prose, an exclamation point is used rarely, if at all, and in newspaper writing the exclamation point is virtually nonexistent.

The Exclamation Mark

16 Feb

The Exclamation
Mark

interjection, or command.

Use an exclamation point [ ! ] at the end of an emphatic declaration,

“No!” he yelled. “Do it now!”

An exclamation mark may be used to close questions that are meant to convey extreme emotion, as in

What on earth are you doing! Stop!

An exclamation mark can be inserted within parentheses to emphasize a word within a sentence.

We have some really(!) low-priced rugs on sale this week.

Note that there is no space between the last letter of the word so emphasized and the parentheses. This device should be used rarely, if ever, in formal text.

An exclamation mark will often accompany mimetically produced sounds, as in

“All night long, the dogs woof! in my neighbor’s yard” and

“The bear went Grr!, and I went left.”

If an exclamation mark is part of an italicized or underlined title, make sure that the exclamation mark is also italicized or underlined:

My favorite book is Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

(Do not add a period after such a sentence that ends with the title’s exclamation mark. The exclamation mark will also suffice to end the sentence.) If the exclamation mark is not part of a sentence-ending title, don’t italicize the exclamation mark:

I’ve asked you not to sing la Marseillaise!

In academic prose, an exclamation point is used rarely, if at all, and in newspaper writing the exclamation point is virtually nonexistent.

The Exclamation Mark

16 Feb

The Exclamation
Mark

interjection, or command.

Use an exclamation point [ ! ] at the end of an emphatic declaration,

“No!” he yelled. “Do it now!”

An exclamation mark may be used to close questions that are meant to convey extreme emotion, as in

What on earth are you doing! Stop!

An exclamation mark can be inserted within parentheses to emphasize a word within a sentence.

We have some really(!) low-priced rugs on sale this week.

Note that there is no space between the last letter of the word so emphasized and the parentheses. This device should be used rarely, if ever, in formal text.

An exclamation mark will often accompany mimetically produced sounds, as in

“All night long, the dogs woof! in my neighbor’s yard” and

“The bear went Grr!, and I went left.”

If an exclamation mark is part of an italicized or underlined title, make sure that the exclamation mark is also italicized or underlined:

My favorite book is Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

(Do not add a period after such a sentence that ends with the title’s exclamation mark. The exclamation mark will also suffice to end the sentence.) If the exclamation mark is not part of a sentence-ending title, don’t italicize the exclamation mark:

I’ve asked you not to sing la Marseillaise!

In academic prose, an exclamation point is used rarely, if at all, and in newspaper writing the exclamation point is virtually nonexistent.

The Exclamation Mark

16 Feb

The Exclamation
Mark

interjection, or command.

Use an exclamation point [ ! ] at the end of an emphatic declaration,

“No!” he yelled. “Do it now!”

An exclamation mark may be used to close questions that are meant to convey extreme emotion, as in

What on earth are you doing! Stop!

An exclamation mark can be inserted within parentheses to emphasize a word within a sentence.

We have some really(!) low-priced rugs on sale this week.

Note that there is no space between the last letter of the word so emphasized and the parentheses. This device should be used rarely, if ever, in formal text.

An exclamation mark will often accompany mimetically produced sounds, as in

“All night long, the dogs woof! in my neighbor’s yard” and

“The bear went Grr!, and I went left.”

If an exclamation mark is part of an italicized or underlined title, make sure that the exclamation mark is also italicized or underlined:

My favorite book is Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

(Do not add a period after such a sentence that ends with the title’s exclamation mark. The exclamation mark will also suffice to end the sentence.) If the exclamation mark is not part of a sentence-ending title, don’t italicize the exclamation mark:

I’ve asked you not to sing la Marseillaise!

In academic prose, an exclamation point is used rarely, if at all, and in newspaper writing the exclamation point is virtually nonexistent.

Semicolon Rules

16 Feb

Semicolon Rules
The following rules and examples will help you know when and where to use the semicolon as a punctuation mark.

  • Use a semicolon to combine two very closely related complete sentences.
    Toni Morrison uses parabolic storytelling in her writing; she seldom writes in a linear mode. Many people believe the state quarters released from the United States Mint will be valuable someday; although this is possible, the coins may also turn out to be worth no more than their actual value of 25 cents.

  • Use a semicolon along with a conjunctive adverb and a comma to clarify the relationship between two closely related complete sentences. Conjunctive adverbs include however, therefore, in addition, moreover, subsequently, consequently, instead, and additionally.
    The Leaning Tower of Pisa is in danger of falling over; however, engineers are trying to stabilize its foundation. The Five Nations respects the abilities of all its people; therefore, both women and men participate in making tribal decisions.

  • Use a semicolon to separate a series of phrases or clauses that are long or have punctuation, like commas, within them.
    In Walden, Henry David Thoreau encourages individuals to find their own way of life rather than conforming to the ideas of others; to seek the truth and beauty of life in nature; and to learn about themselves and the world by experiencing life instead of just studying it. The University’s community outreach committee was led by three individuals: Erica Hunt, a full-time student; Dave Woods, a Center for Information Media administrator; and Joyce Wilkins, a business professor.

Semicolon Rules

16 Feb

Semicolon Rules
The following rules and examples will help you know when and where to use the semicolon as a punctuation mark.

  • Use a semicolon to combine two very closely related complete sentences.
    Toni Morrison uses parabolic storytelling in her writing; she seldom writes in a linear mode. Many people believe the state quarters released from the United States Mint will be valuable someday; although this is possible, the coins may also turn out to be worth no more than their actual value of 25 cents.

  • Use a semicolon along with a conjunctive adverb and a comma to clarify the relationship between two closely related complete sentences. Conjunctive adverbs include however, therefore, in addition, moreover, subsequently, consequently, instead, and additionally.
    The Leaning Tower of Pisa is in danger of falling over; however, engineers are trying to stabilize its foundation. The Five Nations respects the abilities of all its people; therefore, both women and men participate in making tribal decisions.

  • Use a semicolon to separate a series of phrases or clauses that are long or have punctuation, like commas, within them.
    In Walden, Henry David Thoreau encourages individuals to find their own way of life rather than conforming to the ideas of others; to seek the truth and beauty of life in nature; and to learn about themselves and the world by experiencing life instead of just studying it. The University’s community outreach committee was led by three individuals: Erica Hunt, a full-time student; Dave Woods, a Center for Information Media administrator; and Joyce Wilkins, a business professor.

Semicolon Rules

16 Feb

Semicolon Rules
The following rules and examples will help you know when and where to use the semicolon as a punctuation mark.

  • Use a semicolon to combine two very closely related complete sentences.
    Toni Morrison uses parabolic storytelling in her writing; she seldom writes in a linear mode. Many people believe the state quarters released from the United States Mint will be valuable someday; although this is possible, the coins may also turn out to be worth no more than their actual value of 25 cents.

  • Use a semicolon along with a conjunctive adverb and a comma to clarify the relationship between two closely related complete sentences. Conjunctive adverbs include however, therefore, in addition, moreover, subsequently, consequently, instead, and additionally.
    The Leaning Tower of Pisa is in danger of falling over; however, engineers are trying to stabilize its foundation. The Five Nations respects the abilities of all its people; therefore, both women and men participate in making tribal decisions.

  • Use a semicolon to separate a series of phrases or clauses that are long or have punctuation, like commas, within them.
    In Walden, Henry David Thoreau encourages individuals to find their own way of life rather than conforming to the ideas of others; to seek the truth and beauty of life in nature; and to learn about themselves and the world by experiencing life instead of just studying it. The University’s community outreach committee was led by three individuals: Erica Hunt, a full-time student; Dave Woods, a Center for Information Media administrator; and Joyce Wilkins, a business professor.