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condone

16 Feb
con·done Listen to audio/kənˈdoʊn/ verb

con·dones; con·doned; con·don·ing

[+ obj] : to forgive or approve (something that is considered wrong) : to allow (something that is considered wrong) to continue
a government that has been accused of condoning racismoften used in negative statements We cannot condone [=excuse] that kind of behavior.

condone

16 Feb
con·done Listen to audio/kənˈdoʊn/ verb

con·dones; con·doned; con·don·ing

[+ obj] : to forgive or approve (something that is considered wrong) : to allow (something that is considered wrong) to continue
a government that has been accused of condoning racismoften used in negative statements We cannot condone [=excuse] that kind of behavior.

condone

16 Feb
con·done Listen to audio/kənˈdoʊn/ verb

con·dones; con·doned; con·don·ing

[+ obj] : to forgive or approve (something that is considered wrong) : to allow (something that is considered wrong) to continue
a government that has been accused of condoning racismoften used in negative statements We cannot condone [=excuse] that kind of behavior.

The Period

16 Feb

The Period

See
Use a period at the end of a command.

  • Hand in the poster essays no later than noon on Friday.
  • In case of tremors, leave the building immediately.

Use a period at the end of an indirect question.

  • The teacher asked why Maria had left out the easy exercises.
  • My father used to wonder why Egbert’s ears were so big.

Use a period with abbreviations:

    Dr. Espinoza arrived from Washington, D.C., at 6 p.m.

Notice that when the period ending the abbreviation comes at the end of a sentence, it will also suffice to end the sentence. On the other hand, when an abbreviation ends a question or exclamation, it is appropriate to add a question mark or exclamation mark after the abbreviation-ending period:

    Did you enjoy living in Washington, D.C.?

Occasionally, a statement will end with a question. When that happens, it is appropriate to end the sentence with a question mark.

  • We can get to Boston quicker, can’t we, if we take the interstate?
  • His question was, can we end this statement with a question mark?
  • She ended her remarks with a resounding why not?
Acronyms (abbreviations [usually made up of the first letter from a series of words] which we pronounce as words, not a series of letters) usually do not require periods: NATO, NOW, VISTA, LASER, SCUBA, RADAR. Abbreviations we pronounce by spelling out the letters may or may not use periods and you will have to use a dictionary to be sure: FBI, NAACP, NCAA, U.S.A., U.N.I.C.E.F., etc.

The Period

16 Feb

The Period

See
Use a period at the end of a command.

  • Hand in the poster essays no later than noon on Friday.
  • In case of tremors, leave the building immediately.

Use a period at the end of an indirect question.

  • The teacher asked why Maria had left out the easy exercises.
  • My father used to wonder why Egbert’s ears were so big.

Use a period with abbreviations:

    Dr. Espinoza arrived from Washington, D.C., at 6 p.m.

Notice that when the period ending the abbreviation comes at the end of a sentence, it will also suffice to end the sentence. On the other hand, when an abbreviation ends a question or exclamation, it is appropriate to add a question mark or exclamation mark after the abbreviation-ending period:

    Did you enjoy living in Washington, D.C.?

Occasionally, a statement will end with a question. When that happens, it is appropriate to end the sentence with a question mark.

  • We can get to Boston quicker, can’t we, if we take the interstate?
  • His question was, can we end this statement with a question mark?
  • She ended her remarks with a resounding why not?
Acronyms (abbreviations [usually made up of the first letter from a series of words] which we pronounce as words, not a series of letters) usually do not require periods: NATO, NOW, VISTA, LASER, SCUBA, RADAR. Abbreviations we pronounce by spelling out the letters may or may not use periods and you will have to use a dictionary to be sure: FBI, NAACP, NCAA, U.S.A., U.N.I.C.E.F., etc.

The Period

16 Feb

The Period

See
Use a period at the end of a command.

  • Hand in the poster essays no later than noon on Friday.
  • In case of tremors, leave the building immediately.

Use a period at the end of an indirect question.

  • The teacher asked why Maria had left out the easy exercises.
  • My father used to wonder why Egbert’s ears were so big.

Use a period with abbreviations:

    Dr. Espinoza arrived from Washington, D.C., at 6 p.m.

Notice that when the period ending the abbreviation comes at the end of a sentence, it will also suffice to end the sentence. On the other hand, when an abbreviation ends a question or exclamation, it is appropriate to add a question mark or exclamation mark after the abbreviation-ending period:

    Did you enjoy living in Washington, D.C.?

Occasionally, a statement will end with a question. When that happens, it is appropriate to end the sentence with a question mark.

  • We can get to Boston quicker, can’t we, if we take the interstate?
  • His question was, can we end this statement with a question mark?
  • She ended her remarks with a resounding why not?
Acronyms (abbreviations [usually made up of the first letter from a series of words] which we pronounce as words, not a series of letters) usually do not require periods: NATO, NOW, VISTA, LASER, SCUBA, RADAR. Abbreviations we pronounce by spelling out the letters may or may not use periods and you will have to use a dictionary to be sure: FBI, NAACP, NCAA, U.S.A., U.N.I.C.E.F., etc.

The Period

16 Feb

The Period

See
Use a period at the end of a command.

  • Hand in the poster essays no later than noon on Friday.
  • In case of tremors, leave the building immediately.

Use a period at the end of an indirect question.

  • The teacher asked why Maria had left out the easy exercises.
  • My father used to wonder why Egbert’s ears were so big.

Use a period with abbreviations:

    Dr. Espinoza arrived from Washington, D.C., at 6 p.m.

Notice that when the period ending the abbreviation comes at the end of a sentence, it will also suffice to end the sentence. On the other hand, when an abbreviation ends a question or exclamation, it is appropriate to add a question mark or exclamation mark after the abbreviation-ending period:

    Did you enjoy living in Washington, D.C.?

Occasionally, a statement will end with a question. When that happens, it is appropriate to end the sentence with a question mark.

  • We can get to Boston quicker, can’t we, if we take the interstate?
  • His question was, can we end this statement with a question mark?
  • She ended her remarks with a resounding why not?
Acronyms (abbreviations [usually made up of the first letter from a series of words] which we pronounce as words, not a series of letters) usually do not require periods: NATO, NOW, VISTA, LASER, SCUBA, RADAR. Abbreviations we pronounce by spelling out the letters may or may not use periods and you will have to use a dictionary to be sure: FBI, NAACP, NCAA, U.S.A., U.N.I.C.E.F., etc.

contribute

16 Feb

con·trib·ute Listen to audio/kənˈtrɪbju:t/ verb

con·trib·utes; con·trib·ut·ed; con·trib·ut·ing

1 : to give (something, such as money, goods, or time) to help a person, group, cause, or organization usually + to or toward [+ obj] He contributed [=donated] 100 dollars to the charity. The volunteers contributed their time towards cleaning up the city. She contributed [=added] little to the discussion. [no obj] We’re trying to raise money for a new school, and we’re hoping that everyone will contribute. He did not contribute to the project.

2 [no obj] : to help to cause something to happen In order for the team to win, everyone has to contribute.usually + to Many players have contributed to the team’s success. Heavy drinking contributed to her death. [=heavy drinking helped to cause her death]

3 : to write (something, such as a story, poem, or essay) for a magazine [+ obj] He contributed many poems to the magazine. [no obj] Ten scientists contributed to the special edition of the journal.

— contributing adjective
The coach’s positive attitude was a contributing factor to/in the team’s success. [=the coach’s positive attitude was a reason for the team’s success] She has been a contributing writer/editor for the magazine for 10 years.
— con·trib·u·tor Listen to audio /kənˈtrɪbjətɚ/ noun, plural con·trib·u·tors [count]
She is a regular/frequent contributor to the magazine. a list of contributors who have donated more than one thousand dollars

contribute

16 Feb

con·trib·ute Listen to audio/kənˈtrɪbju:t/ verb

con·trib·utes; con·trib·ut·ed; con·trib·ut·ing

1 : to give (something, such as money, goods, or time) to help a person, group, cause, or organization usually + to or toward [+ obj] He contributed [=donated] 100 dollars to the charity. The volunteers contributed their time towards cleaning up the city. She contributed [=added] little to the discussion. [no obj] We’re trying to raise money for a new school, and we’re hoping that everyone will contribute. He did not contribute to the project.

2 [no obj] : to help to cause something to happen In order for the team to win, everyone has to contribute.usually + to Many players have contributed to the team’s success. Heavy drinking contributed to her death. [=heavy drinking helped to cause her death]

3 : to write (something, such as a story, poem, or essay) for a magazine [+ obj] He contributed many poems to the magazine. [no obj] Ten scientists contributed to the special edition of the journal.

— contributing adjective
The coach’s positive attitude was a contributing factor to/in the team’s success. [=the coach’s positive attitude was a reason for the team’s success] She has been a contributing writer/editor for the magazine for 10 years.
— con·trib·u·tor Listen to audio /kənˈtrɪbjətɚ/ noun, plural con·trib·u·tors [count]
She is a regular/frequent contributor to the magazine. a list of contributors who have donated more than one thousand dollars

contribute

16 Feb

con·trib·ute Listen to audio/kənˈtrɪbju:t/ verb

con·trib·utes; con·trib·ut·ed; con·trib·ut·ing

1 : to give (something, such as money, goods, or time) to help a person, group, cause, or organization usually + to or toward [+ obj] He contributed [=donated] 100 dollars to the charity. The volunteers contributed their time towards cleaning up the city. She contributed [=added] little to the discussion. [no obj] We’re trying to raise money for a new school, and we’re hoping that everyone will contribute. He did not contribute to the project.

2 [no obj] : to help to cause something to happen In order for the team to win, everyone has to contribute.usually + to Many players have contributed to the team’s success. Heavy drinking contributed to her death. [=heavy drinking helped to cause her death]

3 : to write (something, such as a story, poem, or essay) for a magazine [+ obj] He contributed many poems to the magazine. [no obj] Ten scientists contributed to the special edition of the journal.

— contributing adjective
The coach’s positive attitude was a contributing factor to/in the team’s success. [=the coach’s positive attitude was a reason for the team’s success] She has been a contributing writer/editor for the magazine for 10 years.
— con·trib·u·tor Listen to audio /kənˈtrɪbjətɚ/ noun, plural con·trib·u·tors [count]
She is a regular/frequent contributor to the magazine. a list of contributors who have donated more than one thousand dollars