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The Period

16 Feb

The Period

See
Use a period at the end of a command.

  • Hand in the poster essays no later than noon on Friday.
  • In case of tremors, leave the building immediately.

Use a period at the end of an indirect question.

  • The teacher asked why Maria had left out the easy exercises.
  • My father used to wonder why Egbert’s ears were so big.

Use a period with abbreviations:

    Dr. Espinoza arrived from Washington, D.C., at 6 p.m.

Notice that when the period ending the abbreviation comes at the end of a sentence, it will also suffice to end the sentence. On the other hand, when an abbreviation ends a question or exclamation, it is appropriate to add a question mark or exclamation mark after the abbreviation-ending period:

    Did you enjoy living in Washington, D.C.?

Occasionally, a statement will end with a question. When that happens, it is appropriate to end the sentence with a question mark.

  • We can get to Boston quicker, can’t we, if we take the interstate?
  • His question was, can we end this statement with a question mark?
  • She ended her remarks with a resounding why not?
Acronyms (abbreviations [usually made up of the first letter from a series of words] which we pronounce as words, not a series of letters) usually do not require periods: NATO, NOW, VISTA, LASER, SCUBA, RADAR. Abbreviations we pronounce by spelling out the letters may or may not use periods and you will have to use a dictionary to be sure: FBI, NAACP, NCAA, U.S.A., U.N.I.C.E.F., etc.
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The Period

16 Feb

The Period

See
Use a period at the end of a command.

  • Hand in the poster essays no later than noon on Friday.
  • In case of tremors, leave the building immediately.

Use a period at the end of an indirect question.

  • The teacher asked why Maria had left out the easy exercises.
  • My father used to wonder why Egbert’s ears were so big.

Use a period with abbreviations:

    Dr. Espinoza arrived from Washington, D.C., at 6 p.m.

Notice that when the period ending the abbreviation comes at the end of a sentence, it will also suffice to end the sentence. On the other hand, when an abbreviation ends a question or exclamation, it is appropriate to add a question mark or exclamation mark after the abbreviation-ending period:

    Did you enjoy living in Washington, D.C.?

Occasionally, a statement will end with a question. When that happens, it is appropriate to end the sentence with a question mark.

  • We can get to Boston quicker, can’t we, if we take the interstate?
  • His question was, can we end this statement with a question mark?
  • She ended her remarks with a resounding why not?
Acronyms (abbreviations [usually made up of the first letter from a series of words] which we pronounce as words, not a series of letters) usually do not require periods: NATO, NOW, VISTA, LASER, SCUBA, RADAR. Abbreviations we pronounce by spelling out the letters may or may not use periods and you will have to use a dictionary to be sure: FBI, NAACP, NCAA, U.S.A., U.N.I.C.E.F., etc.

The Period

16 Feb

The Period

See
Use a period at the end of a command.

  • Hand in the poster essays no later than noon on Friday.
  • In case of tremors, leave the building immediately.

Use a period at the end of an indirect question.

  • The teacher asked why Maria had left out the easy exercises.
  • My father used to wonder why Egbert’s ears were so big.

Use a period with abbreviations:

    Dr. Espinoza arrived from Washington, D.C., at 6 p.m.

Notice that when the period ending the abbreviation comes at the end of a sentence, it will also suffice to end the sentence. On the other hand, when an abbreviation ends a question or exclamation, it is appropriate to add a question mark or exclamation mark after the abbreviation-ending period:

    Did you enjoy living in Washington, D.C.?

Occasionally, a statement will end with a question. When that happens, it is appropriate to end the sentence with a question mark.

  • We can get to Boston quicker, can’t we, if we take the interstate?
  • His question was, can we end this statement with a question mark?
  • She ended her remarks with a resounding why not?
Acronyms (abbreviations [usually made up of the first letter from a series of words] which we pronounce as words, not a series of letters) usually do not require periods: NATO, NOW, VISTA, LASER, SCUBA, RADAR. Abbreviations we pronounce by spelling out the letters may or may not use periods and you will have to use a dictionary to be sure: FBI, NAACP, NCAA, U.S.A., U.N.I.C.E.F., etc.

The Period

16 Feb

The Period

See
Use a period at the end of a command.

  • Hand in the poster essays no later than noon on Friday.
  • In case of tremors, leave the building immediately.

Use a period at the end of an indirect question.

  • The teacher asked why Maria had left out the easy exercises.
  • My father used to wonder why Egbert’s ears were so big.

Use a period with abbreviations:

    Dr. Espinoza arrived from Washington, D.C., at 6 p.m.

Notice that when the period ending the abbreviation comes at the end of a sentence, it will also suffice to end the sentence. On the other hand, when an abbreviation ends a question or exclamation, it is appropriate to add a question mark or exclamation mark after the abbreviation-ending period:

    Did you enjoy living in Washington, D.C.?

Occasionally, a statement will end with a question. When that happens, it is appropriate to end the sentence with a question mark.

  • We can get to Boston quicker, can’t we, if we take the interstate?
  • His question was, can we end this statement with a question mark?
  • She ended her remarks with a resounding why not?
Acronyms (abbreviations [usually made up of the first letter from a series of words] which we pronounce as words, not a series of letters) usually do not require periods: NATO, NOW, VISTA, LASER, SCUBA, RADAR. Abbreviations we pronounce by spelling out the letters may or may not use periods and you will have to use a dictionary to be sure: FBI, NAACP, NCAA, U.S.A., U.N.I.C.E.F., etc.

account

14 Feb

account verb accounts; account·ed; account·ing

[+ obj] formal : to think of (someone or something) in a specified way — usually used as (be) accounted Their first project was accounted [=considered] a success.
 
account for [phrasal verb]

1 account for (something) a : to give a reason or explanation for (something)
Eventually, you will need to account for your actions/behavior. How do you account for [=explain] your success? The informal saying there’s no accounting for taste means that there is no way to understand why some people like something while other people do not.
I don’t see why they liked the movie, but there’s no accounting for taste.

b : to be the cause of (something)
The disease accounted for over 10,000 deaths last year. These new features account for the computer’s higher price. The disease cannot be accounted for [=explained] by genetics alone. There must be other causes as well.
c : to make up or form (a part of something)
Women account for [=constitute, compose] only 25 percent of our employees.
d US : to think about (something) before doing something : to take (something) into consideration
The researchers failed to account for the fact that most of the students were poor.

 

2 account for (someone or something) a : to show what happened to (someone or something)
We have to account for the time [=to say how much time] we spend on each activity. I’ll have to account for the money I spent. : to know the location of (someone or something) The government couldn’t account for millions of dollars of the taxpayers’ money. Is everyone accounted for? [=do we know where everyone is?] All present and accounted for. [=everyone who is supposed to be here is here]
b : to destroy or kill (someone or something)
Enemy fighters have accounted for most of our bombers, Sir. ; also chiefly Brit : to defeat or beat (someone or something)
We accounted for [=dispatched] the challengers 3–2.

account

14 Feb

account verb accounts; account·ed; account·ing

[+ obj] formal : to think of (someone or something) in a specified way — usually used as (be) accounted Their first project was accounted [=considered] a success.
 
account for [phrasal verb]

1 account for (something) a : to give a reason or explanation for (something)
Eventually, you will need to account for your actions/behavior. How do you account for [=explain] your success? The informal saying there’s no accounting for taste means that there is no way to understand why some people like something while other people do not.
I don’t see why they liked the movie, but there’s no accounting for taste.

b : to be the cause of (something)
The disease accounted for over 10,000 deaths last year. These new features account for the computer’s higher price. The disease cannot be accounted for [=explained] by genetics alone. There must be other causes as well.
c : to make up or form (a part of something)
Women account for [=constitute, compose] only 25 percent of our employees.
d US : to think about (something) before doing something : to take (something) into consideration
The researchers failed to account for the fact that most of the students were poor.

 

2 account for (someone or something) a : to show what happened to (someone or something)
We have to account for the time [=to say how much time] we spend on each activity. I’ll have to account for the money I spent. : to know the location of (someone or something) The government couldn’t account for millions of dollars of the taxpayers’ money. Is everyone accounted for? [=do we know where everyone is?] All present and accounted for. [=everyone who is supposed to be here is here]
b : to destroy or kill (someone or something)
Enemy fighters have accounted for most of our bombers, Sir. ; also chiefly Brit : to defeat or beat (someone or something)
We accounted for [=dispatched] the challengers 3–2.

account

14 Feb

account verb accounts; account·ed; account·ing

[+ obj] formal : to think of (someone or something) in a specified way — usually used as (be) accounted Their first project was accounted [=considered] a success.
 
account for [phrasal verb]

1 account for (something) a : to give a reason or explanation for (something)
Eventually, you will need to account for your actions/behavior. How do you account for [=explain] your success? The informal saying there’s no accounting for taste means that there is no way to understand why some people like something while other people do not.
I don’t see why they liked the movie, but there’s no accounting for taste.

b : to be the cause of (something)
The disease accounted for over 10,000 deaths last year. These new features account for the computer’s higher price. The disease cannot be accounted for [=explained] by genetics alone. There must be other causes as well.
c : to make up or form (a part of something)
Women account for [=constitute, compose] only 25 percent of our employees.
d US : to think about (something) before doing something : to take (something) into consideration
The researchers failed to account for the fact that most of the students were poor.

 

2 account for (someone or something) a : to show what happened to (someone or something)
We have to account for the time [=to say how much time] we spend on each activity. I’ll have to account for the money I spent. : to know the location of (someone or something) The government couldn’t account for millions of dollars of the taxpayers’ money. Is everyone accounted for? [=do we know where everyone is?] All present and accounted for. [=everyone who is supposed to be here is here]
b : to destroy or kill (someone or something)
Enemy fighters have accounted for most of our bombers, Sir. ; also chiefly Brit : to defeat or beat (someone or something)
We accounted for [=dispatched] the challengers 3–2.