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PHRASAL VERBS ( INTRANSITIVE VERBS WITH PARTICLES )

6 Ene

Intransitive Verbs with Particles

Some verbs are called transitive because they are followed by an object, which is always a noun phrase. Some verbs are called intransitive because they are not followed by an object. The verbs in the idioms below are intransitive, because objects do not follow them, but are followed by words such as around, on, through, and up. Such words are called particles because they cannot be separated from the verbs by adverbs (e.g. It is incorrect to say: It died quickly down.).

You should understand these expressions, know other ways of saying the same thing, and know which of these synonyms to use in a particular context. You can learn a lot about an idiom if you look at the context of its use. Try to guess the meaning of each idiom as it is used in the following sentences. Then, click on any idiom for complete explanations and examples, but be aware that these expressions may have other meanings not listed here. Remember: you can use Word Neighbors to find out how frequently any expression is used in English.

For three days the wind blew hard and strong, but on the fourth day it died down.

I thought John and Mary were happy, but they recently got a divorce; how did it come about?

My old car has a very bad engine; it will probably break down and need repairs.

If you want to get ahead in life, you have to work hard and save your money.

His poor clothes really stood out at the meeting because everyone else was wearing a suit and tie.

Since you don’t have a car or motorcycle, how do you get around?

Our plans for a trip to Europe fell through because we hadn’t saved enough money for the plane tickets.

Please hold on; I’d like to ask a question before you continue your lecture.

He told me all of his marriage problems, from beginning to end; he really opened up.

Because several students didn’t understand the teacher’s ideas, many questions came up.

While 1 was talking, Tom broke in to tell me that he disagreed.

After 1 spent two hours trying to explain the difficult idea, John finally caught on.

While his friends were playing football, poor Joe, who had a broken leg, could only look on.

At first the students in my class were too noisy, but eventually they settled down to work.

It’s already 10 o’clock and Bill hasn’t come yet; if he doesn’t show up soon, our meeting will fall through.

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PHRASAL VERBS ( INTRANSITIVE VERBS WITH PARTICLES )

6 Ene

Intransitive Verbs with Particles

Some verbs are called transitive because they are followed by an object, which is always a noun phrase. Some verbs are called intransitive because they are not followed by an object. The verbs in the idioms below are intransitive, because objects do not follow them, but are followed by words such as around, on, through, and up. Such words are called particles because they cannot be separated from the verbs by adverbs (e.g. It is incorrect to say: It died quickly down.).

You should understand these expressions, know other ways of saying the same thing, and know which of these synonyms to use in a particular context. You can learn a lot about an idiom if you look at the context of its use. Try to guess the meaning of each idiom as it is used in the following sentences. Then, click on any idiom for complete explanations and examples, but be aware that these expressions may have other meanings not listed here. Remember: you can use Word Neighbors to find out how frequently any expression is used in English.

For three days the wind blew hard and strong, but on the fourth day it died down.

I thought John and Mary were happy, but they recently got a divorce; how did it come about?

My old car has a very bad engine; it will probably break down and need repairs.

If you want to get ahead in life, you have to work hard and save your money.

His poor clothes really stood out at the meeting because everyone else was wearing a suit and tie.

Since you don’t have a car or motorcycle, how do you get around?

Our plans for a trip to Europe fell through because we hadn’t saved enough money for the plane tickets.

Please hold on; I’d like to ask a question before you continue your lecture.

He told me all of his marriage problems, from beginning to end; he really opened up.

Because several students didn’t understand the teacher’s ideas, many questions came up.

While 1 was talking, Tom broke in to tell me that he disagreed.

After 1 spent two hours trying to explain the difficult idea, John finally caught on.

While his friends were playing football, poor Joe, who had a broken leg, could only look on.

At first the students in my class were too noisy, but eventually they settled down to work.

It’s already 10 o’clock and Bill hasn’t come yet; if he doesn’t show up soon, our meeting will fall through.

PHRASAL VERBS ( INTRANSITIVE VERBS WITH PARTICLES )

6 Ene

Intransitive Verbs with Particles

Some verbs are called transitive because they are followed by an object, which is always a noun phrase. Some verbs are called intransitive because they are not followed by an object. The verbs in the idioms below are intransitive, because objects do not follow them, but are followed by words such as around, on, through, and up. Such words are called particles because they cannot be separated from the verbs by adverbs (e.g. It is incorrect to say: It died quickly down.).

You should understand these expressions, know other ways of saying the same thing, and know which of these synonyms to use in a particular context. You can learn a lot about an idiom if you look at the context of its use. Try to guess the meaning of each idiom as it is used in the following sentences. Then, click on any idiom for complete explanations and examples, but be aware that these expressions may have other meanings not listed here. Remember: you can use Word Neighbors to find out how frequently any expression is used in English.

For three days the wind blew hard and strong, but on the fourth day it died down.

I thought John and Mary were happy, but they recently got a divorce; how did it come about?

My old car has a very bad engine; it will probably break down and need repairs.

If you want to get ahead in life, you have to work hard and save your money.

His poor clothes really stood out at the meeting because everyone else was wearing a suit and tie.

Since you don’t have a car or motorcycle, how do you get around?

Our plans for a trip to Europe fell through because we hadn’t saved enough money for the plane tickets.

Please hold on; I’d like to ask a question before you continue your lecture.

He told me all of his marriage problems, from beginning to end; he really opened up.

Because several students didn’t understand the teacher’s ideas, many questions came up.

While 1 was talking, Tom broke in to tell me that he disagreed.

After 1 spent two hours trying to explain the difficult idea, John finally caught on.

While his friends were playing football, poor Joe, who had a broken leg, could only look on.

At first the students in my class were too noisy, but eventually they settled down to work.

It’s already 10 o’clock and Bill hasn’t come yet; if he doesn’t show up soon, our meeting will fall through.

PHRASAL VERBS ( INTRANSITIVE VERBS WITH PARTICLES )

6 Ene

Intransitive Verbs with Particles

Some verbs are called transitive because they are followed by an object, which is always a noun phrase. Some verbs are called intransitive because they are not followed by an object. The verbs in the idioms below are intransitive, because objects do not follow them, but are followed by words such as around, on, through, and up. Such words are called particles because they cannot be separated from the verbs by adverbs (e.g. It is incorrect to say: It died quickly down.).

You should understand these expressions, know other ways of saying the same thing, and know which of these synonyms to use in a particular context. You can learn a lot about an idiom if you look at the context of its use. Try to guess the meaning of each idiom as it is used in the following sentences. Then, click on any idiom for complete explanations and examples, but be aware that these expressions may have other meanings not listed here. Remember: you can use Word Neighbors to find out how frequently any expression is used in English.

For three days the wind blew hard and strong, but on the fourth day it died down.

I thought John and Mary were happy, but they recently got a divorce; how did it come about?

My old car has a very bad engine; it will probably break down and need repairs.

If you want to get ahead in life, you have to work hard and save your money.

His poor clothes really stood out at the meeting because everyone else was wearing a suit and tie.

Since you don’t have a car or motorcycle, how do you get around?

Our plans for a trip to Europe fell through because we hadn’t saved enough money for the plane tickets.

Please hold on; I’d like to ask a question before you continue your lecture.

He told me all of his marriage problems, from beginning to end; he really opened up.

Because several students didn’t understand the teacher’s ideas, many questions came up.

While 1 was talking, Tom broke in to tell me that he disagreed.

After 1 spent two hours trying to explain the difficult idea, John finally caught on.

While his friends were playing football, poor Joe, who had a broken leg, could only look on.

At first the students in my class were too noisy, but eventually they settled down to work.

It’s already 10 o’clock and Bill hasn’t come yet; if he doesn’t show up soon, our meeting will fall through.

PHRASAL VERBS ( INTRANSITIVE VERBS WITH PARTICLES )

6 Ene

Intransitive Verbs with Particles

Some verbs are called transitive because they are followed by an object, which is always a noun phrase. Some verbs are called intransitive because they are not followed by an object. The verbs in the idioms below are intransitive, because objects do not follow them, but are followed by words such as around, on, through, and up. Such words are called particles because they cannot be separated from the verbs by adverbs (e.g. It is incorrect to say: It died quickly down.).

You should understand these expressions, know other ways of saying the same thing, and know which of these synonyms to use in a particular context. You can learn a lot about an idiom if you look at the context of its use. Try to guess the meaning of each idiom as it is used in the following sentences. Then, click on any idiom for complete explanations and examples, but be aware that these expressions may have other meanings not listed here. Remember: you can use Word Neighbors to find out how frequently any expression is used in English.

For three days the wind blew hard and strong, but on the fourth day it died down.

I thought John and Mary were happy, but they recently got a divorce; how did it come about?

My old car has a very bad engine; it will probably break down and need repairs.

If you want to get ahead in life, you have to work hard and save your money.

His poor clothes really stood out at the meeting because everyone else was wearing a suit and tie.

Since you don’t have a car or motorcycle, how do you get around?

Our plans for a trip to Europe fell through because we hadn’t saved enough money for the plane tickets.

Please hold on; I’d like to ask a question before you continue your lecture.

He told me all of his marriage problems, from beginning to end; he really opened up.

Because several students didn’t understand the teacher’s ideas, many questions came up.

While 1 was talking, Tom broke in to tell me that he disagreed.

After 1 spent two hours trying to explain the difficult idea, John finally caught on.

While his friends were playing football, poor Joe, who had a broken leg, could only look on.

At first the students in my class were too noisy, but eventually they settled down to work.

It’s already 10 o’clock and Bill hasn’t come yet; if he doesn’t show up soon, our meeting will fall through.