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Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK

9 May

Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK:

Mac cartoon 2-5-12
This cartoon by Mac from The Daily Mail combines two news stories: the long queues at Heathrow Airport’s passport control and the floods which have been causing chaos in Wales and southern Britain.
A planeload of Americans have just arrived at a flooded Heathrow Airport and are disembarking. An airport employee holding an umbrella tells them, “Welcome to the UK, folks. Please swim over to the arrivals building and join the queues.”
PRONUNCIATION
Queue (kjuː) rhymes with ‘blue’.
VOCABULARY
In British English queue is also used as a verb. • Passengers had to queue for two hours at passport control. In most areas of the U.S., it is usual to say that people are waiting/standing in line for something. ▪ We waited in line for more than an hour to get tickets. In some areas, especially in and near New York City, on line is used instead. ▪ We waited on line for more than an hour.
COMMENTS
1. Paul Thomas has a similar cartoon in The Daily Express.
2. Wikipedia has a fascinating article about queues and queueing.

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Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK

9 May

Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK:

Mac cartoon 2-5-12
This cartoon by Mac from The Daily Mail combines two news stories: the long queues at Heathrow Airport’s passport control and the floods which have been causing chaos in Wales and southern Britain.
A planeload of Americans have just arrived at a flooded Heathrow Airport and are disembarking. An airport employee holding an umbrella tells them, “Welcome to the UK, folks. Please swim over to the arrivals building and join the queues.”
PRONUNCIATION
Queue (kjuː) rhymes with ‘blue’.
VOCABULARY
In British English queue is also used as a verb. • Passengers had to queue for two hours at passport control. In most areas of the U.S., it is usual to say that people are waiting/standing in line for something. ▪ We waited in line for more than an hour to get tickets. In some areas, especially in and near New York City, on line is used instead. ▪ We waited on line for more than an hour.
COMMENTS
1. Paul Thomas has a similar cartoon in The Daily Express.
2. Wikipedia has a fascinating article about queues and queueing.

Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK

9 May

Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK:

Mac cartoon 2-5-12
This cartoon by Mac from The Daily Mail combines two news stories: the long queues at Heathrow Airport’s passport control and the floods which have been causing chaos in Wales and southern Britain.
A planeload of Americans have just arrived at a flooded Heathrow Airport and are disembarking. An airport employee holding an umbrella tells them, “Welcome to the UK, folks. Please swim over to the arrivals building and join the queues.”
PRONUNCIATION
Queue (kjuː) rhymes with ‘blue’.
VOCABULARY
In British English queue is also used as a verb. • Passengers had to queue for two hours at passport control. In most areas of the U.S., it is usual to say that people are waiting/standing in line for something. ▪ We waited in line for more than an hour to get tickets. In some areas, especially in and near New York City, on line is used instead. ▪ We waited on line for more than an hour.
COMMENTS
1. Paul Thomas has a similar cartoon in The Daily Express.
2. Wikipedia has a fascinating article about queues and queueing.

Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK

9 May

Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK:

Mac cartoon 2-5-12
This cartoon by Mac from The Daily Mail combines two news stories: the long queues at Heathrow Airport’s passport control and the floods which have been causing chaos in Wales and southern Britain.
A planeload of Americans have just arrived at a flooded Heathrow Airport and are disembarking. An airport employee holding an umbrella tells them, “Welcome to the UK, folks. Please swim over to the arrivals building and join the queues.”
PRONUNCIATION
Queue (kjuː) rhymes with ‘blue’.
VOCABULARY
In British English queue is also used as a verb. • Passengers had to queue for two hours at passport control. In most areas of the U.S., it is usual to say that people are waiting/standing in line for something. ▪ We waited in line for more than an hour to get tickets. In some areas, especially in and near New York City, on line is used instead. ▪ We waited on line for more than an hour.
COMMENTS
1. Paul Thomas has a similar cartoon in The Daily Express.
2. Wikipedia has a fascinating article about queues and queueing.

Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK

9 May

Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK:

Mac cartoon 2-5-12
This cartoon by Mac from The Daily Mail combines two news stories: the long queues at Heathrow Airport’s passport control and the floods which have been causing chaos in Wales and southern Britain.
A planeload of Americans have just arrived at a flooded Heathrow Airport and are disembarking. An airport employee holding an umbrella tells them, “Welcome to the UK, folks. Please swim over to the arrivals building and join the queues.”
PRONUNCIATION
Queue (kjuː) rhymes with ‘blue’.
VOCABULARY
In British English queue is also used as a verb. • Passengers had to queue for two hours at passport control. In most areas of the U.S., it is usual to say that people are waiting/standing in line for something. ▪ We waited in line for more than an hour to get tickets. In some areas, especially in and near New York City, on line is used instead. ▪ We waited on line for more than an hour.
COMMENTS
1. Paul Thomas has a similar cartoon in The Daily Express.
2. Wikipedia has a fascinating article about queues and queueing.

Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK

9 May

Mac Cartoon: Welcome to the UK:

Mac cartoon 2-5-12
This cartoon by Mac from The Daily Mail combines two news stories: the long queues at Heathrow Airport’s passport control and the floods which have been causing chaos in Wales and southern Britain.
A planeload of Americans have just arrived at a flooded Heathrow Airport and are disembarking. An airport employee holding an umbrella tells them, “Welcome to the UK, folks. Please swim over to the arrivals building and join the queues.”
PRONUNCIATION
Queue (kjuː) rhymes with ‘blue’.
VOCABULARY
In British English queue is also used as a verb. • Passengers had to queue for two hours at passport control. In most areas of the U.S., it is usual to say that people are waiting/standing in line for something. ▪ We waited in line for more than an hour to get tickets. In some areas, especially in and near New York City, on line is used instead. ▪ We waited on line for more than an hour.
COMMENTS
1. Paul Thomas has a similar cartoon in The Daily Express.
2. Wikipedia has a fascinating article about queues and queueing.