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Who vs. Which vs. That

18 May

Who vs. Which vs. That

Rule: Who refers to people. That and which refer to groups or things.
Example: Anya is the one who rescued the bird.

Example:
 Lope is on the team that won first place.

Example:
 She belongs to an organization that specializes in saving endangered species.

Rule:
 That introduces essential clauses while which introduces nonessential clauses.
Example: I do not trust editorials that claim racial differences in intelligence.
We would not know which editorials were being discussed without the that clause.
Example: The editorial claiming racial differences in intelligence, which appeared in the Sunday newspaper, upset me.
The editorial is already identified. Therefore, which begins a nonessential clause.
NOTE: Essential clauses do not have commas surrounding them while nonessential clauses are surrounded by commas.

Rule:
 Do not use that twice in a row in a sentence.
Example: That is a problem which can’t be solved without a calculator.
The above sentence would be better written as follows:
That problem can’t be solved without a calculator.
Example: That is a promise which cannot be broken.
Again, the above sentence could be rewritten:
That promise cannot be broken.
Rule: Whenever you have more than one that or which in a sentence, see if you can rewrite it in a way that both shortens your sentence and removes at least one that or which.
Rule: Put that in the sentence when it is implied.

Example:
 Did you know he went to the University of Florida? OR
Did you know that he went to the University of Florida? (Correct)
Posted on Saturday, May 10th, 2008 at 1:21 am

Whoever vs. Whomever

In the “English Rules” section of my site, GrammarBook.com, you will find my simple explanation for determining whether to use who or whom.
Briefly, this is the trick:
who = he (subject pronouns)
whom = him (object pronouns)
Example: Who/Whom is at the door?
He is at the door.
Example: For who/whom should I vote?
Should I vote for him?
To determine whether to use whoever or whomever, here is the trick:
him + he = whoever
him + him = whomever
Examples: 
Give it to whoever/whomever asks for it first.
Give it to himHe asks for it first.
Therefore, Give it to whoever asks for it first.
We will hire whoever/whomever you recommend.
We will hire him. You recommend him.
him + him = whomever
We will hire whoever/whomever is most qualified.
We will hire himHe is most qualified.
him + he = whoever
When the entire whoever/whomever clause is the subject of the verb following the clause, look inside the clause to determine whether to use whoever or whomever.
Examples:
Whoever is elected will serve a four-year term.
Whoever is elected is the subject of will serve.
Whoever is the subject of is.
Whomever you elect will serve a four-year term.
Whomever you elect is the subject of will serve.
Whomever is the object of you elect.
Pop Quiz
  1. Omar will talk about his girlfriend with whoever/whomever asks him.
  2. Kimiko donates her time to whoever/whomever needs it most.
  3. Quinton will work on the project with whoever/whomever you suggest.
  4. Whoever/Whomever wins the lottery will become a millionaire.
Answers
  1. whoever
  2. whoever
  3. whomever
  4. Whoever
Posted on Sunday, May 27th, 2007 at 9:41 pm

Who vs. Whom

Let’s crack the code for who and whom. It is easier than you might imagine. In addition, I will give you the technique for learning when to use whoever vs. whomever. The following are informal methods rather than rules; however, they really work!
Rule: Use who when you could replace it with he.
Example: Who/whom is standing by the gate?
We would say, “He is standing by the gate.” So who is correct.
Example: Gail wished she knew who/whom won.
Gail wished is a subject and verb pair (also called a clause). She knew is another subject and verb pair (clause). Who/whom wonthe third clause, is the one we care about here. We would say, “He won.” So who is correct.

Rule:
 Use whom when you could replace it with him.
Example: To who/whom am I speaking?
Let’s turn the question into a sentence to make it easier: I am speaking to who/whom. We would say, “I am speaking to him.” Therefore, whom is correct.
Example: Hank wanted to know on who/whom the prank was pulled.
Hank wanted to know is a clause. That leaves on who/whom the prank was pulled. Again, let’s turn the question into a sentence: The prank was pulled on who/whom. We would say, “The prank was pulled on him.” Therefore, whom is correct.
Now, wouldn’t it be nice to know when to use whoever and whomever with confidence? Once again, I’ll give you techniques that work.
Rule: Use ever on the end of who or whom when who or whom fits into both clauses.
Example: Give it to ________ asks for it first.
We could say, “Give it to him.” But we could also say, “He asks for it first.” In other words,who/whom fits into both clauses. That tells us to use ever on the end of who or whom. Now, is the correct answer whoever or whomever ?
Rule: When you have a he/him combination, use whoever. When you have a him/himcombination, use whomever.
In the example above, we had a he/him combination. So the answer is this: Give it to whoever asks for it first.
Example: We will hire _________ you recommend.
We could say, “We will hire him.” But we could also say, “You recommend him.” Again, who/whomfits into both clauses. That tells us to use ever. This time we have a him/him combination. So the answer is this: We will hire whomever you recommend.
Pop Quiz
1. Who/Whom should I ask to the dance?
2. Cedric hasn’t decided who/whom should be appointed yet.
3. I’m looking for an assistant on who/whom I can depend.
Answers to Pop Quiz
1. Whom should I ask to the dance?
2. Cedric hasn’t decided who should be appointed yet.
3. I’m looking for an assistant on whom I can depend.
Posted on Monday, May 1st, 2006 at 3:46 pm

fuente : http://data.grammarbook.com/blog/category/whowhomwhoeverwhomever/


Who vs. Which vs. That

18 May

Who vs. Which vs. That

Rule: Who refers to people. That and which refer to groups or things.
Example: Anya is the one who rescued the bird.

Example:
 Lope is on the team that won first place.

Example:
 She belongs to an organization that specializes in saving endangered species.

Rule:
 That introduces essential clauses while which introduces nonessential clauses.
Example: I do not trust editorials that claim racial differences in intelligence.
We would not know which editorials were being discussed without the that clause.
Example: The editorial claiming racial differences in intelligence, which appeared in the Sunday newspaper, upset me.
The editorial is already identified. Therefore, which begins a nonessential clause.
NOTE: Essential clauses do not have commas surrounding them while nonessential clauses are surrounded by commas.

Rule:
 Do not use that twice in a row in a sentence.
Example: That is a problem which can’t be solved without a calculator.
The above sentence would be better written as follows:
That problem can’t be solved without a calculator.
Example: That is a promise which cannot be broken.
Again, the above sentence could be rewritten:
That promise cannot be broken.
Rule: Whenever you have more than one that or which in a sentence, see if you can rewrite it in a way that both shortens your sentence and removes at least one that or which.
Rule: Put that in the sentence when it is implied.

Example:
 Did you know he went to the University of Florida? OR
Did you know that he went to the University of Florida? (Correct)
Posted on Saturday, May 10th, 2008 at 1:21 am

Whoever vs. Whomever

In the “English Rules” section of my site, GrammarBook.com, you will find my simple explanation for determining whether to use who or whom.
Briefly, this is the trick:
who = he (subject pronouns)
whom = him (object pronouns)
Example: Who/Whom is at the door?
He is at the door.
Example: For who/whom should I vote?
Should I vote for him?
To determine whether to use whoever or whomever, here is the trick:
him + he = whoever
him + him = whomever
Examples: 
Give it to whoever/whomever asks for it first.
Give it to himHe asks for it first.
Therefore, Give it to whoever asks for it first.
We will hire whoever/whomever you recommend.
We will hire him. You recommend him.
him + him = whomever
We will hire whoever/whomever is most qualified.
We will hire himHe is most qualified.
him + he = whoever
When the entire whoever/whomever clause is the subject of the verb following the clause, look inside the clause to determine whether to use whoever or whomever.
Examples:
Whoever is elected will serve a four-year term.
Whoever is elected is the subject of will serve.
Whoever is the subject of is.
Whomever you elect will serve a four-year term.
Whomever you elect is the subject of will serve.
Whomever is the object of you elect.
Pop Quiz
  1. Omar will talk about his girlfriend with whoever/whomever asks him.
  2. Kimiko donates her time to whoever/whomever needs it most.
  3. Quinton will work on the project with whoever/whomever you suggest.
  4. Whoever/Whomever wins the lottery will become a millionaire.
Answers
  1. whoever
  2. whoever
  3. whomever
  4. Whoever
Posted on Sunday, May 27th, 2007 at 9:41 pm

Who vs. Whom

Let’s crack the code for who and whom. It is easier than you might imagine. In addition, I will give you the technique for learning when to use whoever vs. whomever. The following are informal methods rather than rules; however, they really work!
Rule: Use who when you could replace it with he.
Example: Who/whom is standing by the gate?
We would say, “He is standing by the gate.” So who is correct.
Example: Gail wished she knew who/whom won.
Gail wished is a subject and verb pair (also called a clause). She knew is another subject and verb pair (clause). Who/whom wonthe third clause, is the one we care about here. We would say, “He won.” So who is correct.

Rule:
 Use whom when you could replace it with him.
Example: To who/whom am I speaking?
Let’s turn the question into a sentence to make it easier: I am speaking to who/whom. We would say, “I am speaking to him.” Therefore, whom is correct.
Example: Hank wanted to know on who/whom the prank was pulled.
Hank wanted to know is a clause. That leaves on who/whom the prank was pulled. Again, let’s turn the question into a sentence: The prank was pulled on who/whom. We would say, “The prank was pulled on him.” Therefore, whom is correct.
Now, wouldn’t it be nice to know when to use whoever and whomever with confidence? Once again, I’ll give you techniques that work.
Rule: Use ever on the end of who or whom when who or whom fits into both clauses.
Example: Give it to ________ asks for it first.
We could say, “Give it to him.” But we could also say, “He asks for it first.” In other words,who/whom fits into both clauses. That tells us to use ever on the end of who or whom. Now, is the correct answer whoever or whomever ?
Rule: When you have a he/him combination, use whoever. When you have a him/himcombination, use whomever.
In the example above, we had a he/him combination. So the answer is this: Give it to whoever asks for it first.
Example: We will hire _________ you recommend.
We could say, “We will hire him.” But we could also say, “You recommend him.” Again, who/whomfits into both clauses. That tells us to use ever. This time we have a him/him combination. So the answer is this: We will hire whomever you recommend.
Pop Quiz
1. Who/Whom should I ask to the dance?
2. Cedric hasn’t decided who/whom should be appointed yet.
3. I’m looking for an assistant on who/whom I can depend.
Answers to Pop Quiz
1. Whom should I ask to the dance?
2. Cedric hasn’t decided who should be appointed yet.
3. I’m looking for an assistant on whom I can depend.
Posted on Monday, May 1st, 2006 at 3:46 pm

fuente : http://data.grammarbook.com/blog/category/whowhomwhoeverwhomever/